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Assemble and Charlotte Skene Catling discuss the craft of architecture

Flint House at Waddesdon by Charlotte Skene Catling (credit: James Morris)
Flint House at Waddesdon by Charlotte Skene Catling (credit: James Morris)

Celebrated for the artistry of their work, Assemble and Charlotte Skene Catling discuss the craft of architecture with Richard Wentworth and Will Hunter at the London School of Architecture’s monthly Show and Tell Social.

Architecture was known as ‘the Mother of All Arts’. But today architects are increasingly treated, not as imaginative practitioners, but as mere service providers in thrall to the whims of the market. In such circumstances, is there still space for creativity and craft in contemporary architecture?

Exploring these issues through a presentation of their own work are Charlotte Skene Catling, whose Flint House won RIBA House of the Year 2015, and Assemble, who won the Turner Prize 2015. Following the talks, Richard Wentworth will join a panel discussion chaired by Will Hunter.

 

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Biographies

Assemble is a multi-disciplinary collective working across architecture, design and art. Founded in 2010 to undertake a single self-built project, Assemble has since delivered a diverse and award-winning body of work, whilst retaining a democratic and co-operative working method that enables built, social and research-based work at a variety of scales, both making things and making things happen. They won the Turner Prize in 2015.

Charlotte Skene Catling is a co-founder of Skene Catling de la Peña architects. Among a diverse range of creative activity, she has collaborated with Malcolm McLaren on a number of film scripts and is currently completing a research project on representation in architecture with the Royal College of Art and the Rothschild Foundation. Charlotte currently teaches at the Karlsruhe Institut of Technology (KIT) in Germany.

Richard Wentworth is an artist working primarily with sculpture and photography. Since the late 1960s, his work has been concerned with material, language and the ways that humans cope with their environment. Countering the trend towards gigantism in post-war British sculpture, his work has always found aesthetic merit in modest events and things. Wentworth’s repurposing of everyday objects continues the language game of the ready-made, extending and inflecting it with precision and material sensitivity.