Mar 24

LSA and Black Females in Architecture (BFA) Announce new partnership

Feb 24

24/25 Admissions Open Evening – 6 March

Dec 23

2023 LSA GRADUATES WIN RIBA SILVER MEDAL AND COMMENDATION

Nov 23

STEFAN BOLLINGER APPOINTED AS CHAIR OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Nov 23

STEPHEN LAWRENCE DAY FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP

Nov 23

APPLICATIONS ARE OPEN FOR OUR PART 2 MARCH FOR 2024/25

Nov 23

Open Evening – 7 December 2023

Oct 23

BOOK PART 4 NOW: SHORT COURSES – MODULAR LIFELONG LEARNING – FUTURE PRACTICE

Aug 23

IN MEMORIAM – PETER BUCHANAN

Jul 23

The LSA is Moving

Jun 23

Become a Critical Practice Tutor at the LSA for 2023/24

Jun 23

Become a Design Tutor at the LSA for 2023/24

Jun 23

Pathways: Exhibiting Forms

Jun 23

City as Campus: The Furniture Practice

Jun 23

Summer Show 2023: FLAARE Futures Workshop

Jun 23

Summer Show 2023: Meet Your Future Employer

Jun 23

Summer Show 2023: Close to Home

May 23

WE ARE SEEKING A NEW FINANCE MANAGER

Mar 23

Nigel Coates: Liberating the Plan

Mar 23

AN INTERVIEW WITH ELLIOTT WANG, SECOND YEAR REP

Feb 23

PART 4 LAUNCH

Feb 23

IN MEMORIAM – CLIVE SALL

Feb 23

Our Design Charrettes – an insight into life at the LSA

Feb 23

BOOK NOW – OPEN EVENING WEDNESDAY 8 MARCH

Feb 23

An Interview with Emily Dew-Fribbance: LSA Alumna and First Year Design Tutor

Feb 23

Pathways: Optic Translations

Jan 23

Thursday Talks: Questioning How we Embed Sustainable Design in Practice

Jan 23

An Interview with LSA alumna Betty Owoo

Jan 23

Interview with Marianne Krogh – Rethinking water as a planetary and design element in the making of the Danish Pavilion at Venice Biennale

Dec 22

What do our students think of studying at the LSA? We spoke to Second Year student Semi Han

Dec 22

Hear from our Alumni – An Interview with Calven Lee

Dec 22

National Saturday Club Programme

Nov 22

LSA Alumnus Jack Banting published in FRAME

Nov 22

2022/23 Design Think Tank Module Launches

Nov 22

Mentoring can transform the architecture profession – for good

Nov 22

APPLICATIONS ARE OPEN FOR 2023/24

Nov 22

Alternative Routes To Registration: An Evening with ARB (17/11/2022)

Nov 22

Circular architecture needs material passports

Nov 22

Apply To The LSA: Online Intro (23/11/2022)

Oct 22

LSA Registrar

Oct 22

London School of Architecture announces strategic collaboration with Black in Architecture

Aug 22

LSA Summer Design Charrette

Jul 22

How fire has shaped London – from 1666 to Grenfell

Jul 22

Voices on: Architecture and Fire Safety

Jun 22

JOB OPPORTUNITY:  DESIGN TECTONICS TUTOR

Jun 22

JOB OPPORTUNITY:  DESIGN DIRECTION MODULE LEADER

Jun 22

JOB OPPORTUNITY:  DESIGN HISTORY TUTORS

Jun 22

JOB OPPORTUNITY: DESIGN STUDIO TUTORS

Jun 22

JOB OPPORTUNITY:  DESIGN CITIES MODULE LEADER

Jun 22

Voices on: Architecture and Displacement

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AN INTERVIEW WITH ELLIOTT WANG, SECOND YEAR REP

The LSA is at the forefront of educational innovation – we are asking big questions about real world challenges to face inequity and the climate emergency. We understand that these issues are very important to the upcoming generation of architects and the future of the profession, and we work hard to equip students with the tools they need to tackle climate, social and other real-world challenges head on. We are excited to welcome a new cohort of students who share our ethos in September – if you want to be part of this movement for change, there is just over a week left before our next cycle deadline and you can apply now.

Last week we spoke with Second Year Student Rep Elliott Wang, one of many of our students who seeks to question and challenge current societal systems through his architecture. Elliott is currently working on his Design Thesis project, which is about domestic reproductive labour and its presence within our dwellings. This project questions how experimental forms of collective living can begin to challenge our preconceived understanding of this type of work, pushing the limits of the collective and individual.

Orsman Rd, Haggerston. Elliott stands across the canal from our studio space. Photography by Bo Morgan.

Elliott has also recently helped develop the new student-led event series ‘Pathways’, which aims to explore design parallels by highlighting the works and processes of artists, makers, designers, and thinkers, offering alternative pathways to architectural work. During his Student Placement he worked at Studio Shaw.

Elliott speaks about what appealed to him about The LSA, how studying with us has changed the way he designs and what he thinks prospective students should know about the LSA before they apply. 

Thanks for your time Elliott! Firstly, can you tell me why you chose to study at the LSA?
Because the course offered an atypical approach to a master’s degree.

The socially minded, progressive and questioning form of design teaching offered something unique, whilst the relationship with practice and the overlapping elements of the course with the profession was something I was really interested in. The small-scale aspect of the school also offered a master’s degree that seemed more personal and active.

And what’s it like, now you’re here and studying?
Very dynamic. Modules are designed to work together to inform an overall strategy of design thinking, whilst the involvement with practice throughout the course fosters a unique exchange of experience and knowledge, unlike most master’s courses. The general atmosphere within the school is very comfortable and welcoming, both within your year, across the cohort and between faculty and students.

Orsman road, Haggerston. Elliott and fellow Second Year student Semi discussing their thesis projects. Photography by Bo Morgan.

During your first year you did your student placement in Studio Shaw. Did enjoy working in practice alongside studying?
Yes, I did. Working in practice allowed me to enhance and support my university design projects whilst encouraging the challenging and questioning of the profession.

Did splitting your time across practice and your studies affect how you interact with your year group at all?
It’s actually really useful – the year group became a network of knowledge picked up through the various forms of work everyone did in practice as well as being a welcome element of support.

Has studying at the LSA changed how you design?
Yes. The LSA functions as a testbed for a multitude of ideas. Starting at the extremes of a project is something that I personally enjoy doing and something that is really facilitated and energised within each of our modules and by tutors and staff.

Elliott’s thesis project takes the stance that we must re-establish how we value domestic reproductive forms of labour in our dwellings and how this is reflected within our society.

What is the most important thing for prospective students to know before they apply to the LSA?
Prospective students should not hold back or be restrained with their design thinking. The LSA is a place that encourages radical, progressive, and questioning forms of design. It is much more exciting to push the limits of a project than start with the most basic version.

 And finally, you’ve spoken about the LSA being a place that pushes for change in the Built Environment. What change do you want to see in Architecture, and how does the way you design contribute to that change?
Architecturally, I think more of an allowance for experimentation would have an interesting impact on all elements of the modern city.  I’d love to see us move away from our obsession with possession and ownership which largely dictates the way in which cities and their inhabitants function. I think any design process that starts with an understanding and questioning of existing physical, political, social, and economic conditions can begin to enable this. The LSA really drives for and encourages these processes allowing us to believe that change is possible, even under current systems.

Thanks Elliott, that was great!